MotionComposer 1.6

Create Flash or HTML Animations

MotionComposer helps to make a user’s life easier when it comes to Web animations and interactivity. Creating banner ads, interactivity for the Web, and any kind of animation is effortless and fun. The best part is that you don’t need any coding experience to use MotionComposer 1.6. Its uncomplicated interface outputs in HTML5 and Flash, making interactivity and animations run on any smartphone, tablet, computer, or even Apple’s iOS. You no longer have to worry about browser compatibility.

Once you start using MotionComposer 1.6, you’ll realize that the interface looks familiar: On the right is your work area with dialogs for tools and controls, and below is your timeline with slides. The timeline makes it simple to add graphics, sound, and interactivity. One great feature is the direct drag-and-drop-to-a-slide functionality. You can drag-and-drop music directly from your iTunes library, graphic files, videos on your computer, and basically any components that you need to make your animation. Then, it’s easy to move all these components around and set key points for your animations. When you duplicate slides with animations, the program has a few quirks, but they’re minor.

You don’t have to be a developer to benefit from using MotionComposer 1.6 to create animated content for Websites and e-books that are viewable on any device. For Web animations and interactivity, MotionComposer’s easy-to-use interface and cross-browser compatibility make this a great program for users of all skill levels.

Company: Aquafadas SAS
Price: $149
Web: www.aquafadas.com
Rating: 4
Hot:  No coding; exports to HTML5 and Flash
Not: Duplication of slides may cause problems

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  1. Tim (Reply) on Monday October 14, 2013

    For the cost, your money is much better spent purchasing Tumult Hype.
    I recommend you review that app next.
    Additionally, Aquafadas has a history of poor customer service. I know that first hand.



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