Rhino Slider Carbon

The Rhino Slider Carbon is a camera slider based on two exposed carbon fiber rails capable of carrying loads of up to 10 lbs. The rails are mounted on a cleverly designed pair of feet that can be placed at any angle to accommodate for uneven terrain. Nothing on this slider requires you to use any tools. You can mount, remove, and fix everything by hand.

Screen Density and Mobile Devices

Understanding how different mobile devices display images can be confusing. Tom Green walks viewers through a basic explanation of screen density and how it differs between mobile devices. He discusses the difference between hardware pixels and reference pixels and the importance of device pixel ratio.

Promote Control

Shooting up to 45 bracketed images for HDR unattended, time-lapse, bulb ramping, focus stacking, and a hyperfocal distance calculator all wrapped in a device the size of an iPod—that’s the Promote Control.

Adding WhiteSpace to InDesign Type

This video explains the various add space options in InDesign. Em space and En space are explained, as well as nonbreaking space, flush space, figure space, and punctuation space.

Portrait Professional 11 Studio 64 Edition

I’ve had the opportunity to play with the newest version of Portrait Professional Studio 64 Edition by Anthropics Technology Ltd., and it’s been great fun.

Compositing Problem-Solving in After Effects

In this video, Daniel creates a space-themed movie poster from scratch with After Effects compositing techniques that include layer masking, blending modes, text animation, lens flares and particle effects.

Responsive Design with Edge Reflow – The Basics of Design

Use Reflow to create responsive design for everything from desktop to mobile. In this video, Tom Green takes viewers through the design process. He starts with the outer container, then moves on to adding and styling graphic elements, then adding breakpoints and making changes to the design based on screen size. Reflow is the beginning of a promising visual design tool that can make responsive design fast and easy.

The Sensu Brush

When you first see the Sensu Brush, it looks like a silvery version of every other stylus out there. What you don’t see is what’s hidden within. Give the barrel a slight tug and out pops a second piece. When you flip that piece around and combine the two parts again, you find yourself holding a full-length paintbrush. The brush gives you an incredible tactile experience; it feels so good to use that it helps to unleash the artist in you.

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