About Scott Kelby

Scott is the President and CEO of KelbyOne, is also the original “Photoshop Guy”, is the editor and publisher of Photoshop User Magazine, Conference Technical Chair for the Photoshop World Conference & Expo, Training Director and instructor for KelbyOne Live Seminars, and author of a string of bestselling technology and photography books.

Setting Your White Point and Black Point

CREDIT: SCOTT KELBY One way to get the most out of your image editing is to expand the tonal range of your photo by setting your white point and black point (this is something Photoshop users have done for many years using Photoshop’s Levels control). We do this using the Whites and Blacks sliders. We [...]

Dealing with Exposure Problems (the Highlights and Shadows Sliders) in Lightroom

I always think of the Highlights and Shadows sliders as “problem solvers.” Sometimes the problems are caused by what I did in-camera (I took a shot where I let the highlights get clipped, or I took a shot where my subject is backlit and they are pretty much a silhouette), or these problems happen in [...]

Fixing Backlit Photos

By Scott Kelby Excerpt from The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5 Book for Digital Photographers One of the most common digital photography problems is photos where the subject is backlit, so it is almost a black silhouette. I think it’s so common because the human eye adjusts for backlit situations so well that, to our naked [...]

Swapping Out for a Better Sky

By Scott Kelby Excerpt from Photoshop for Lightroom Users This is yet another form of compositing, but it’s kind of “reverse compositing” because, instead of selecting a person or an object and placing it on another background, we’re going to select the background (sky) and replace it with a better one. This is a handy [...]

Creating Backscreened Prints in Lightroom

For all the wonderful things Lightroom’s Print module does, one feature it doesn’t have is one that lets you backscreen a photo (a staple in most wedding albums). So, I came up with a workaround, where we can use a backscreened image as our page background, and then put another non-backscreened image in front of it on the same page. It’s easy, but not really obvious.

Retouching Portraits in Camera Raw

One of the main things we’ve always had to go to Photoshop for was retouching portraits, but now, by using the Spot Removal tool, along with the Adjustment Brush, we can do a lot of simple retouching jobs right here in Camera Raw, where they’re completely non-destructive and surprisingly flexible.

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