About Scott Kelby

Scott is the President and CEO of KelbyOne, is also the original “Photoshop Guy”, is the editor and publisher of Photoshop User Magazine, Conference Technical Chair for the Photoshop World Conference & Expo, Training Director and instructor for KelbyOne Live Seminars, and author of a string of bestselling technology and photography books.

Creating Backscreened Prints in Lightroom

For all the wonderful things Lightroom’s Print module does, one feature it doesn’t have is one that lets you backscreen a photo (a staple in most wedding albums). So, I came up with a workaround, where we can use a backscreened image as our page background, and then put another non-backscreened image in front of it on the same page. It’s easy, but not really obvious.

Retouching Portraits in Camera Raw

One of the main things we’ve always had to go to Photoshop for was retouching portraits, but now, by using the Spot Removal tool, along with the Adjustment Brush, we can do a lot of simple retouching jobs right here in Camera Raw, where they’re completely non-destructive and surprisingly flexible.

Easily Apply the Trendy Desaturated Skin Look in Photoshop

This is just about the hottest Photoshop portrait technique out there right now, and you see it popping up everywhere, from covers of magazines to CD covers, from print ads to Hollywood movie posters, and from editorial images to billboards. It seems right now everybody wants this effect (and you’re about to be able to deliver it in roughly 60 seconds flat using the simplified method shown here!).

Fixing Gaps in Hair

Retouching hair is one of the trickiest retouches, because the Clone Stamp tool and the Healing Brush tool usually give you pretty lame results.

Fashion Toning Using Photoshop’s Color Lookup Adjustment Layer

You see color toning and film-look effects just about everywhere you look these days in fashion photography, and you can recreate this look using Photoshop’s built-in Color Lookup tables (they instantly remap the colors in your image to create some pretty cool color effects, inspired by the lookup tables used in movie making and video).

Using Lightroom’s Highlights & Shadows Sliders to Deal with Exposure Problems

Lightroom’s Highlights and Shadows sliders are the sliders that I always think of as the “problem solvers.” Sometimes the problems are caused by what I did in-camera (I took a shot where I let the highlights get clipped, or I took a shot where my subject is backlit and they are pretty much a silhouette), or these problems happen in Lightroom because of other changes I’ve made with other sliders. Here, we’ll take a look at how to use these two slider to solve a problems like these.

Planet Photoshop Photoshop World KelbyOne Lightroom Killer Tips Scott Kelby