About mark fleming

In this tutorial I describe color toning of a black and white image using tools available within Photoshop CS3

There are many techniques for combining photos into one High Dynamic Range image. Follow along with this workflow to create the effect using Lightroom.

This method will not fix an image that is out of focus. Rather, it will add an extra degree of crispness, really bringing out details and making your image pop.

This tutorial describes one of my favorite techniques for ‘spicing’ up a photograph. This method is adapted from the color darkroom of old.

As many of you know, it is difficult to obtain good exposure in both the highlights and shadows of scenes that exhibit a high dynamic range of light.

In this tutorial I describe color toning of a black and white image using tools available within Photoshop CS3. All you need to follow along with this tutorial is a black and white image, your CS3 software, and some quirky ideas. The first thing you do is convert one of your color images (select one of your favorites) into a black and white image. There are many ways to do this, however, for this tutorial you simply use a black and white adjustment layer. Select the New Adjustment Layer icon in the bottom of your Layers Palette. Choose Black & White. Then click OK at the New Layer dialog. Presto, the black and white adjustment layer tool converts your color image to a gray scale image and you now have a black and white image. The reason I prefer this method, as opposed to simply changing your Image Mode to gray scale (a common way of converting to black and white) is that by using the Adjustment Layer you are able to adjust each color channel individually. This allows you to adjust different sections of the image separately to your personal liking. For instance, on my shot of the remains of a shipwreck, I wanted to darken the sky. To do this I selected Layer>New Adjustment Layer>Black & White. After clicking OK, when the slider dialog opened, I simply moved my cursor inside the image and using the eye dropper tool on the sky, dragged my cursor to the left. Once you have your black and white image adjusted, you are ready to perform the color toning process. To do this, open a new curves adjustment layer by clicking on Layers>New Adjustment Layer>Curves. There's a reason here for opening the new adjustment layer using your tool bar, rather than using the Adjustment Layer icon in your Layers Palette. By using the tool bar you are able to choose your blending mode. Under the Mode drop-down menu, choose Color. After clicking OK to create the new layer, the Curves Adjustment Panel will be opened. Select each color channel individually from the RGB drop down menu. This is where your personal preferences kick in. At this point, ask yourself questions like, 'What mood am I looking for?' 'Is there a particular darkroom toning method I am trying to reproduce?' or even, 'I wonder if I can recreate the colors from my old college tie-dye t-shirt?' These questions will help you choose which colors to increase and which ones to leave alone or maybe even decrease. For example, for my shipwreck shot, I was going for a vintage look, almost like the sepia toned prints of the days of yore. To accomplish this look, I first grabbed my red channel curve - by the way, I recommend grabbing right in the middle - and pulled up. Keep in mind that this is all by 'feel' at this point. Let me point out, however, that the image will appear a bit wacky until you have adjusted each color channel. After I boosted the red quite a bit, I moved on to the green channel. I pushed the green channel up a bit as well, though not as much as the red. Finally, I moved on to the blue channel. In this channel I grabbed the middle of the curve once again. This time, however, I pulled it down a bit. It is at this point you begin to get the feel of how your image will look. Once you have created a look you like you can then go back through each layer and tweak as necessary. After tweaking, and a bit of fun pushing each channel to the max, you will have your finished a toned black and white image. Don't forget, sepia is just one option. I have also included a shot where I used the opposite effect, toning it more blue than red. This feeling has a much more dramatic look, focusing your eye on the texture and detail of the scene. Remember, there are no rules here. If you want to tone an image green - then go for it! Gold? Sure, why not! It's up to you from here gang. Good luck and happy toning. [post_title] => Black and White Toning in Photoshop CS3 [post_excerpt] => In this tutorial I describe color toning of a black and white image using tools available within Photoshop CS3 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 2629 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2008-05-07 15:03:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2008-05-07 20:03:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.layersmagazine.com/2629.html [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 13 [filter] => raw ) [1] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 2565 [post_author] => 208 [post_date] => 2008-04-21 17:23:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-04-21 22:23:00 [post_content] => There are many techniques for giving photos a high-contrast look. Follow along with this workflow to create the effect using Lightroom. [video file="http://media.kelbymediagroup.com/layersmagazine/video/tutorials/fleming_lightroomHDR.flv"] [post_title] => Pseudo-HDR in Lightroom [post_excerpt] => There are many techniques for combining photos into one High Dynamic Range image. Follow along with this workflow to create the effect using Lightroom. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => hdr-in-lightroom [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2010-01-12 12:06:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2010-01-12 17:06:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.layersmagazine.com/hdr-in-lightroom.html [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 24 [filter] => raw ) [2] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 2385 [post_author] => 208 [post_date] => 2008-03-14 17:03:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-03-14 22:03:10 [post_content] => Begin by opening an image you feel needs sharpening. Remember, this method will not fix an image that is out of focus. Rather, it will add an extra degree of crispness, really bringing out details and making your image pop. Once I have my edited file ready, I usually save sharpening for very last. You will want to flatten any layers you may have. Create a copy of the background layer by dragging it to the ‘create new layer’ icon at the bottom of your layers palette. With the newly created ‘Background Copy’ layer selected, go to Filter > Other > High pass. Once you click on the High Pass filter you will get a very strange looking image. What you will see is an almost entirely grey version of your shot, however, if you play with the radius setting in the High Pass dialog, you will notice the edges of your image are highlighted. For sharpening purposes you will want to set your radius anywhere from 0.5 to 1. You will want to set your radius to a point where your edges are just barely visible, then click OK. Next, with your background copy layer selected, press Shift-Command-U (PC: Shift-Ctrl-U). This key combination de-saturates the layer, removing the unusual colors from your edges. The final step is to select the overlay-blending mode for your high pass layer. This will remove the grey appearance and perfectly map your background layer. Of course, the final step is to flatten your image and go directly to print or to web. One thing I do like to do though is to zoom in to a 100% and click the high pass layer visibility on and off. BEFORE (above) AFTER (below) This will clearly show you what the sharpening has done for you. Sometimes the effect is more desirable than others. Play around and soon you will get the feel for which images need sharpening and exactly how much. [post_title] => Sharpening Using High Pass Filter [post_excerpt] => This method will not fix an image that is out of focus. Rather, it will add an extra degree of crispness, really bringing out details and making your image pop. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sharpening-high-pass [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2008-03-14 17:03:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2008-03-14 22:03:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.layersmagazine.com/sharpening-high-pass.html [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 23 [filter] => raw ) [3] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 2386 [post_author] => 208 [post_date] => 2008-02-21 17:03:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-02-21 22:03:01 [post_content] => This tutorial describes one of my favorite techniques for 'spicing' up a photograph. This method is adapted from the color darkroom of old. In those days, innovative photographers often processed film in a chemical solution intended for another type of film. For instance, they might process color slide film in C-41 chemicals. The result yielded a most unusual shift in color, which created a very retro look. To recreate this technique using the computer is both easy and fun. Begin with a processed image that has high contrast. Despite selecting a high contrast image, add even more contrast by selecting a curves adjustment layer from your layers palette. Repeat this process by adding yet another curves adjustment layer, this layer will be used to create the cross processed look. Inside that curves adjustment layer you will select each channel individually from the drop down menu, begin with the Red Channel. The basic rule of thumb is to raise the red and green in the highlights, and to drop the red and green in the shadows. The reverse is true in the blue channel. Drop the blue in the highlights and raise the blue in the shadows. Note as you work through the previous steps that much of the adjusting is based on your own personal preference. Each of your adjustments is up to you and should match your vision of how the image should look. At the conclusion of these steps, the result will resemble a twisted helix Once you have completed your desired adjustments to each channel, click ok to immediately change the blending mode to color. As a final touch, you may choose to add even a bit more contrast. It is surprising just how much contrast a cross processing layer will pull out of your image. You have now created a fine cross processed digital image. [post_title] => Curvy Cross Processing in Photoshop CS3 [post_excerpt] => This tutorial describes one of my favorite techniques for 'spicing' up a photograph. This method is adapted from the color darkroom of old. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => curvy-cross-processing [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2008-02-21 17:03:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2008-02-21 22:03:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.layersmagazine.com/curvy-cross-processing.html [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 64 [filter] => raw ) [4] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 2308 [post_author] => 208 [post_date] => 2008-01-30 15:02:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-01-30 20:02:42 [post_content] => As many of you know, it is difficult to obtain good exposure in both the highlights and shadows of scenes that exhibit a high dynamic range of light. Often, photographers will post-process using an HDR converter to achieve the desired exposure. However, there is another way to achieve correct exposure in both the highlights and shadows without using HDR. This technique begins in the camera. Using a tripod, take two exposures of the same scene. Expose your first image to capture detail in the highlights. Expose your second image to capture shadow detail. (Image 1 above contains the shadow detail, Image 2 below contains the highlight detail) Note: Unlike most HDR processing methods, this technique works better when there is a large difference in light between shadow and highlight. For example, a sunrise or sunset shot would work better than a shot taken in overcast conditions. Once back at your computer, upload your images making sure to label the images in the order they were taken. Select two sequential exposures, one for highlights and one for shadows. Open them both in Adobe Camera RAW. (Note: CS3 Camera Raw is now an option for both TIFF and JPEG files). Select your shadows exposure and make adjustments that enhance the shadow details. Then select your highlights exposure and make adjustments that enhance your highlight details. Once you are happy with these adjustments save them and then open both images in Photoshop. With both images open in Photoshop, hit the ‘F’ key to toggle through the screen modes until you are in Standard Screen Mode where you are able to see each image with a menu bar at the top. Select the Move tool and click on one of the images. Then hold down the Shift key and click-and-drag that image into the other one so that the two are now part of the same document. By holding down the Shift key you are ensuring that both images will line up properly. However, since a perfect set of exposures is often hard to capture in the field, I often follow this step by using CS3s new Auto-Align Layers tool. To take advantage of the Auto-Align tool, the first thing you will need to do is double-click on your background layer and make the background an editable layer. Now you have two editable layers. Next, select both layers by holding down the Shift key and clicking on both. Then, go to the Edit menu and select Auto-Align Layers from the drop down menu. (Use the 'Auto' Projection option) Now you have two perfectly aligned exposures. Again, select both layers in the Layers palette and drag them down to the New Layer icon. This will produce two copies of your active layers. Hide your two newly-created layers by clicking the Eye icon next to them in the Layers Pallete. Next, blend the two layers together. Select the top layer, in this case the highlight detail, and select Blending Options from the Layers Style menu inside the Layers drop-down menu. Inside the Blending Options menu, at the very bottom, you will see two sliders underneath a “blend if” dialog. Move the menu box to the side, making sure you can see your image clearly. Then holding down the Alt key (Option on a Mac) grab the white arrow at the end of the top slider. Holding down the Alt key will split that white arrow in half. Move that half of the arrow toward the black end of the slider. You will notice your image begin to blend. Move the arrow until you feel the correct amount of blending has occurred. Keep in mind the image will appear very flat. Don’t worry, that will be corrected later. Now that you have partially blended the original layers, move back to your unblended layer copies. Make both visible again by clicking to the left of the thumbnail and bringing back the Eye icon. Next, make sure these layers are above your masked layers. One at a time, select the layer, hold the Alt key (Option on a Mac) and click the Add Layer Mask icon. Holding down the Alt key fills the layer masks with black. Add a black layer mask to both of the unblended layer copies. You have just hidden these layers again. However, this time you are able to selectively bring them back. Selectively go through your image adding back pieces of the original exposure where you deem necessary. (I like to use a very low opacity brush, 40 or 50 percent usually works fine.) Make sure to use a large, soft-edged brush to help prevent obvious brush lines in your image. Notice that by gently adding pieces of the original exposure you have already helped add contrast to the scene. Now we are going to create what I like to call a 'working layer'. Once you have blended the layers to your liking, select all the layers using the Shift key and make a copy of each. Select these newly-created copies and use the Fly Out menu at the upper right of your Menu Pallet to select Merge Layers. You have just created a working layer. It is from this layer that dust removal and/or lens corrections are made. Now is the time that you add contrast to your final image. Select a soft-edged brush and go into the Quick Mask mode by pressing ‘Q’. Select portions of the image where you want to add contrast by painting on the image. The areas will show uup red in Quick mask mode. When you have selected the areas that need a boost in contrast, hit 'Q' again and go back to regular view. You will see all of the areas that you painted in red are now selected. In most cases I find a simple curves adjustment layer is all that is necessary. However, this is a good place to experiment with levels as well. Apply your adjustment layer and tweak the settings to your liking. Finish things up with a global curves and levels adjustment to your working layer. Voila! You have yourself a natural High Dynamic Range image without using an HDR converter. [post_title] => HDR Another Way in Photoshop [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => hdr-another-way [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2008-01-30 15:02:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2008-01-30 20:02:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.layersmagazine.com/hdr-%e2%80%93-another-way.html [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 23 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 5 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 2629 [post_author] => 208 [post_date] => 2008-05-07 15:03:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-05-07 20:03:45 [post_content] => Hello all and welcome to the challenging world of black and white photography. Everything should be simpler when processing B&W images, right? After all, everything exists in shades of gray, doesn't it? In this tutorial I describe color toning of a black and white image using tools available within Photoshop CS3. All you need to follow along with this tutorial is a black and white image, your CS3 software, and some quirky ideas. The first thing you do is convert one of your color images (select one of your favorites) into a black and white image. There are many ways to do this, however, for this tutorial you simply use a black and white adjustment layer. Select the New Adjustment Layer icon in the bottom of your Layers Palette. Choose Black & White. Then click OK at the New Layer dialog. Presto, the black and white adjustment layer tool converts your color image to a gray scale image and you now have a black and white image. The reason I prefer this method, as opposed to simply changing your Image Mode to gray scale (a common way of converting to black and white) is that by using the Adjustment Layer you are able to adjust each color channel individually. This allows you to adjust different sections of the image separately to your personal liking. For instance, on my shot of the remains of a shipwreck, I wanted to darken the sky. To do this I selected Layer>New Adjustment Layer>Black & White. After clicking OK, when the slider dialog opened, I simply moved my cursor inside the image and using the eye dropper tool on the sky, dragged my cursor to the left. Once you have your black and white image adjusted, you are ready to perform the color toning process. To do this, open a new curves adjustment layer by clicking on Layers>New Adjustment Layer>Curves. There's a reason here for opening the new adjustment layer using your tool bar, rather than using the Adjustment Layer icon in your Layers Palette. By using the tool bar you are able to choose your blending mode. Under the Mode drop-down menu, choose Color. After clicking OK to create the new layer, the Curves Adjustment Panel will be opened. Select each color channel individually from the RGB drop down menu. This is where your personal preferences kick in. At this point, ask yourself questions like, 'What mood am I looking for?' 'Is there a particular darkroom toning method I am trying to reproduce?' or even, 'I wonder if I can recreate the colors from my old college tie-dye t-shirt?' These questions will help you choose which colors to increase and which ones to leave alone or maybe even decrease. For example, for my shipwreck shot, I was going for a vintage look, almost like the sepia toned prints of the days of yore. To accomplish this look, I first grabbed my red channel curve - by the way, I recommend grabbing right in the middle - and pulled up. Keep in mind that this is all by 'feel' at this point. Let me point out, however, that the image will appear a bit wacky until you have adjusted each color channel. After I boosted the red quite a bit, I moved on to the green channel. I pushed the green channel up a bit as well, though not as much as the red. Finally, I moved on to the blue channel. In this channel I grabbed the middle of the curve once again. This time, however, I pulled it down a bit. It is at this point you begin to get the feel of how your image will look. Once you have created a look you like you can then go back through each layer and tweak as necessary. After tweaking, and a bit of fun pushing each channel to the max, you will have your finished a toned black and white image. Don't forget, sepia is just one option. I have also included a shot where I used the opposite effect, toning it more blue than red. This feeling has a much more dramatic look, focusing your eye on the texture and detail of the scene. Remember, there are no rules here. If you want to tone an image green - then go for it! Gold? Sure, why not! It's up to you from here gang. Good luck and happy toning. 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Planet Photoshop Photoshop World KelbyOne Lightroom Killer Tips Scott Kelby